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How to find campsites in Norway

Category Archives: Norway Travel

How to find campsites in Norway

One of the big advantages of renting a campervan in Norway is the freedom to go anywhere and sleep anywhere, but to really enjoy that advantage you need to find great campsites!

 

In Norway, we have the Freedom to Roam act, which is an amazing thing for campervans, and others traveling around. The Freedom to Roam act basically says that you can park/camp anywhere – as long as there is not a “no camping/no parking” sign, you are not obstructing traffic, or you are closer than 150m to someones private property. This means that there are lots and lots of great places you can stop and camp, all around the country. Lets say you are driving along a quiet road in your campervan and see a stopping place with a great view – most likely you are allowed to camp there!

 

So how do you find campsites in Norway? There are two free apps that we recommend, Stellplatz and Park4Night. These apps have hundreds of campsites listed on interactive maps. Some of these campsites are official campsites with showers and other facilities, and you have to pay somewhere between 150-350 NOK per night. Others are free campsites – it could be just a plot of land at the end of a road next to a river, it could be a free parking space next to a church, it could be a pier next to the ocean, it could be anywhere basically.

 

These apps are very useful, but the best campsites are perhaps best kept secret? In our experience this is actually true, and the best campsites are not always listed on apps, you just find them while driving. So our recommendation is really to do both – keep your eyes open for that perfect place to stop, and if you cant find it that day, check the apps.

 

Ready to book your trip and go look for your perfect campsites?

September – the best month to travel Norway in a campervan?

 

September is a month where the weather can still be very good, there are a lot fewer tourists and the national scenic routes and hikes are still open. If you want to see Norway during a beautiful month and avoid the crowds, September might actually be the best, or one of the best months to travel Norway in a campervan.

 

In Norway, the high season for travel is between June and August, with April, May, September and October considered the shoulder months. The rest of the year, from November until the end of March is the low season.

 

Tourism is increasing in Norway every year. Luckily, it’s a large country geographically, and the numbers are still low compared to most other Europeans countries. Still, the number of tourists can be a bit bothersome during high season and at the most popular sights. If you are travelling during July and early August, you should consider getting up early in the morning to visit the most popular attractions and roads, or before sundown at night. Some people do not mind a bit of crowds, and then you are of course free to visit at any time. The sights, roads and hikes with the highest number of visitors are for example Pulpit rock, Troll tongue hike and Geiranger/Trollstigen.

 

In September, you can visit any of these or other sights more freely and still avoid the crowds. When travelling in late September, please double check to see if a certain hike is still open/recommended. For most of them it will be open, but Troll tongue and some others may be recommended only with a guide in late September or in certain weather conditions. Most or all of the 18 national scenic routes of Norway are usually open in September, and also October.

 

If you hate mosquitos, September also has the advantage of having fewer, or usually no mosquitos at all. Mosquitos can be quite annoying and plentiful in numbers during the warmest months such as July. In some areas of the country it can be very bad. In September, you will most likely not experience any mosquitos at all.

 

One last advantage of September (as well as the other shoulder months) is that Cabin Campers and other rental companies usually have more availability.

 

Every month has some advantages and disadvantages! There are of course many advantages of going on a roadtrip in Norway during June, July or August as well. But for some, September might just be the best option of them all.

 

So what are you waiting for? Book you September roadtrip of a lifetime today. Cabin Campers campervan rental is excited to welcome you to your home on wheels!

Happy new years! Let the 2019 adventure begin!

2018 was our first year in business. It was an adventure! It was hectic and it was lots of fun. We spent the year building our very first van, building our website and the basic structure of our small company. After launching, our first van was fully booked quite quickly, and we decided to add two more campervans during the summer of 2018. We had more than 200 rental-days with guests from 18 countries different countries, including Switzerland, France, Austria, New Zealand, USA, Netherlands, Spain and more. We were near fully booked from July (we launched in late May) until November 1st. From out 2018 pilot-year we learned a lot, and we were inspired to do more.

For 2019 we are adding 5 new campervans, all VW Crafter, and built with a similar style and design, inspired by Norwegian cottages. All the five vans will have the same layout and features, but with some differences in design details, colors etc. The new vans are mostly 2014-2015 models driven around 40-70.000km. The conversion from VW crafter vans to Cabin Campervans will be done in our temporary production facility in Stavanger between January and March.

We have also decided to only offer campervan rentals from Oslo. In 2018 we offered rentals from Stavanger and Oslo, and moved the vans between these cities to accommodate the different bookings. This was at times quite challenging and costly. Perhaps when we add even more vans we will start offering rentals from Stavanger and Oslo (and other locations), but for 2019 our vans will be placed in Oslo and can be picked-up and dropped off from there. For a few early-bookers, who booked from Stavanger, we will of course have your van ready for pick-up in Stavanger on your date!

For 2018 we kept rentals going for November and December as well. October was very busy, and although the summer was over, it was still a great month for traveling around Norway in a campervan. For November and December we had fewer guests and our guests (and our campervans) had a few more challenges associated with winter traveling. In the winter season from November-March the minus degrees can for example lead to frozen water in the van or closed roads that limit travel. Because of these and other challenges we have decided to become a seasonal business, opening our doors in April and closing in November. Lots of travel businesses in Norway operate the same way. If you are one of those people who really wanna travel Norway in the off-season, you can still contact us and request a booking, and we can see what we can offer!

2018 was a great year for us and our campervan rental company. We loved the expressions on guests faces when seeing their van for the first time, and we were super happy with the feedback that we got when they returned. We are very excited about a new year with many new vans, and we are very much looking forward to summer!

Is 2019 the year you want to travel Norway in our unique campervans? You can book your trip directly on our website, or if you have questions, just send us an email to reservations@cabincampers.no

 

Great roadtrips near Stavanger!

There are several really good roadtrips you can take starting in (or very near) Stavanger. Two of these are Ryfylke and Jæren. Both of these are also among the 18 official scenic routes in Norway that we described in another post. Jæren is a short but definitely worthwhile trip (especially if you are interested in beaches and/or surfing), and Ryfylke is a longer roadtrip with lots of classic Norwegian highlights. So lets have a closer look at each of them:

Jæren – 41 km
Norwegian Scenic Route Jæren runs from Ogna to Bore, a total distance of 41 km (Road 44/507). Kvassheim lighthouse, one of the many lighthouses along the coast of Jæren, makes for a lovely detour. Jæren is one of the shorter scenic routes, and to be fair it does not have the attractions and highlights of many of the other scenic routes. There are no mountains or fjords. There are however really nice beaches, coastlines and lighthouses. Its also right outside of Stavanger (around 20 minutes drive) and could be a natural part of making your way out of Stavanger (or short detour). On your way to Ogna, make sure to stop by Sola beach, which is right next to the airport. Jæren is also a great route for surfing.

Orre beach

Surf at Bore beach

For more information see: https://www.nasjonaleturistveger.no/en/routes/j%C3%A6ren

Ryfylke – 260 km (and 2 ferries)
The Ryfylke scenic route is a really interesting roadtrip that gives you a great mini-version of Norway – with mountains, fjords, interesting small towns, waterfalls, modern architecture and more. It starts just 1 hour outside of Stavanger – with the Lauvik-Oanes ferry. While the Ryfylke road trip could be done in a day or two, we recommend a minimum of 3 days/nights. At the northern most point of the roadtrip (Røldal), you are just a few kilometres away from the southern starting point of the Hardanger scenic route as well (see the map).

Some of the main attractions along (or near) the Ryfylke scenic route are:
– Almannajuvet (modern architecture, café and gallery in a historic setting)
– Svandalsfossen (powerful and impressive waterfall that you can get really close to)
– Lysefjorden-Preikestolen (Fjord and the famous pulpit rock 604m above the fjord)
– Sauda (Charming small town with a history of mining)
– Høse bru (modern and impressive architecture in a natural setting – a footbridge crossing the Suldalslågen river)
– Røldal (famous skiing village, and in summer great hiking and mountain views, also features one of the oldest stave churches in Norway)

The famous pulpit rock

Høse bru

Svandalsfossen

For more information see: https://www.nasjonaleturistveger.no/en/routes/ryfylke

Driving a car in Norway – What you need to know

So you plan on renting a campervan and drive all around Norway? Maybe you already booked your Cabin Camper? Lets have a quick talk about some of the basic driving rules and guidelines! Driving a car or campervan in Norway is not difficult, but you should know a few things before you hit the road.

Lets start with a very basic fact – in Norway we drive on the right side of the road – just like most countries in Europe, in addition to the US, Latin America and lots of other countries in the world. If you come from a country driving on the left side of the road and you don’t have any experience “switching sides” – no worries, the transition is easier than you would expect (speaking from personal experiences).

In terms of speed limits: The general rule is to follow the limits set by signs – the second general rule is that rural/country areas have a speed limit of 80 km/h and areas with a bit more people/habitation have a speed limit of 50 km/h. In areas with pedestrian crossings or schools its usually 30 km/h – but again, signs will usually let you know.

Always follow the speed limit!! Norway has lots of speed cameras and traffic controls!

The fine for breaking the speed limits can be really high – sometimes over 10.000 NOK. Unfortunately this is your responsibility when renting a Cabin Camper, so for you own wallet (and safety) please follow the speed limit!

A few other important and general rules:

  • You need to have a drivers license from your country on you
  • You always have to wear a seatbelt
  • Remember that you share the road with cyclists
  • Speed limits on highways are usually 90, 100 or 110

 

For other general information on driving in Norway check out: https://www.visitnorway.com/plan-your-trip/getting-around/by-car/

 

 

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